RACIAL SPOTLIGHT: CAMILA TAVAREZ

HISTORY RACE & CHANGE

May 6, 2021

“ …[S]omething that makes me beyond proud to be a minority, [is] because; I love being part of such a rich and diverse culture, as well as giving me an opportunity to prove people wrong, about a lot of misconceptions they have about a minority girl in America.””

 

SIREN staff writer, Jade Davis, had the honor of interviewing Camila Tavarez, a sophomore health science major from Midland. For this third Racial Spotlight, Tavarez discusses (via email) the perspective of being Afro-Latina. 

 

“I honestly tend to lean towards having both minority and Caucasian friends, but somehow I feel like it’s super hard to be friends with someone who doesn’t really understand what it is to be a minority, and that’s why my Caucasian friends aren’t many. I don’t expect anybody to know what I have to go through, but it’s definitely a bit of a relief when your friends can understand what you have to go through. I pick my friends very wisely, and them being able to understand my struggles as a minority myself and knowing that [they] will be there to stand up for me…it’s a bit of a relief.”

 

“No one has ever said anything hurtful regarding my ethnicity [at Lincoln Park], however I have received random looks when I speak, and those looks come from people who aren’t minorities. However, as I have many minority friends, I have been present with them when they were called the n-word, and even though it wasn’t directly said to me, as an educated minority, I do understand the meaning behind the word and it did hurt me, and I did stand up for my friend…however, it was a very degrading feeling to have to experience that with them, so I stood up.”

 

“I don’t think it’s a bad idea for African American people to use the [n-]word, as long as they feel comfortable using it. However, if you’re not African American or from that descent, that word should never come out of your mouth. Many African[s] follow that logic that because they have suffered from the use of the n-word, they should be the only ones who have the right to use it, and I strongly agree with that because: you’re choosing to use [it], and because to  [African Americans] when they reclaim it, they can use it any way they want. It isn’t necessarily repeating a racial slur; it’s more of an act of defiance. Therefore, the word is thought to have changed in meaning and is only a racial slur if used by a person from another race.”

 

“ …[S]omething that makes me beyond proud to be a minority [is] because I love being part of such a rich and diverse culture, as well as [having the] opportunity to prove people wrong about a lot of misconceptions they have about a minority girl in America.”

 

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About the Writer
Photo of JADE DAVIS
JADE DAVIS, Broadcasting Director


Jade Davis has been writing for the SIREN for two years now. During this time Miss Davis joined another publication as well; called Front Paige News.  Next Summer Jade will also be assisting famous journalist; Ben Westhoff for an internship. Currently, she is soon to be published in  Write On, Door County for her poem; B.L.M. But, Davis has already been published in the Pittsburgh Post Gazette, and the Pittsburgh Tribune Review; for Climate Change opinion letters. On the other hand, Jade Davis has other hobbies such as water aerobics, and spirituality!

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