LET’S TALK ABOUT THE MONEY PLANT: ENERGY AND BELIEFS

GRACE'S GARDEN

January 28, 2021

Recently I’ve come across a plant with a very hefty belief attached to it. That plant is called the Money Plant, or perhaps you’ve heard it be called Devil’s Ivy.

 

This plant’s scientific name is Epipremnum Aureus, and it is native to Southeastern Asia and New Guinea.

 

The Money Plant is one of many plants with a superstition attached to it, but what makes this one so special?

 

To start, this plant is believed to bring a hefty amount of prosperity into the household in which it is kept. It also is believed to bring a great amount of financial wealth into the household it’s planted in as well.

 

The beliefs above come from cultural backgrounds and practices of both India and China, namely Feng Shui and Vastu Shastra. Both belief systems are ancient beliefs that have influenced the image of the money plant to what it is viewed as today; however, both are not religions.

 

Real quick: Feng Shui is a Chinese study of energy, and Vastu Shastra is an Indian study of architecture. Both are ancient, can be participated in by anyone, and are both sciences.

 

Experts from each have a set of suggestions if you are to use the plant.

 

For example, Feng Shui experts suggest placing the plant near devices, corners, and places that generally make you feel uneasy.

 

Considering that energy obviously plays a big role in Feng Shui, things like the money tree help bring good energy and prosperity into a household.

 

As for the presence of the Money Plant in Vastu Shastra, it is suggested that the position and placement of the plant is important to it’s energy.

 

There are a lot of suggestions depending on what room the plant is placed in. For example, if a Money Plant is placed in your bedroom, you may want to put it in the north, east, or south corners of the bedroom.

 

I’d suggest looking into it more depending on what room you’d like to put the Money Plant in.

 

Not only does the money plant bring in positive energy, but it also is said to clean up the air, as well as have many other health benefits.

 

Things like radiation absorption are among the other reasons why people appreciate these plants so much.

 

All in all, I think the Money Plant is pretty cool, and I look forward to figuring out how to grow it!

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About the Writer
Photo of GRACE ANDERSON
GRACE ANDERSON, Editor in Cheif
Grace Anderson is a junior writing and publishing major. This year is her fifth year at Lincoln Park, and she has earned the title of Editor in Chief of The SIREN. She has also served on other W&P staffs for projects such as PULP and a literary anthology called Glassroom.

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